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The scale of the domestic violence problem is almost impossible to comprehend, considering that almost four million women in the United States were abused by their husbands or boyfriends in the past year.

If we counted the number of all of the women that were victims of forced break-ins, muggings and other violent crimes, the sum would not surpass the number of victims of domestic violence. Everyone is aware that this problem crosses all economic, racial, social and religious lines.

Child abuse and domestic violence very frequently occur in the home. The abusers sometimes purposefully hurt minors with the intention of intimidating and controlling their mates. Minors, unfortunately, can become innocent victims during these family escalations. If the aggressor throws an object or brandishes a gun against a mother or girlfriend, for instance, a child can get caught in the middle. When the minors are a bit older, if they attempt to intervene, they could be attacked during a violent episode.    

Steps to Leave an Abuser

If you find yourself in a relationship where there is violence, take the initiative to leave that relationship and flee as quickly as possible to a safe place, such as the home of a friend, family or a safe house for people in emergency situations.

If you do not feel safe leaving the home alone, call the police for help. Alert the police if you want to press legal charges against your abuser.

Take all of the personal items that you can with you, including:

    • keys to your home

 

    • money

 

    • yours and your family’s important documents

 

    • passports

 

  • social security cards

And lastly, remember that your personal doctor, nurses, social workers and other health care workers can also offer you the support you need.

 

Its is critical that you act immediately and do not allow your situation to end tragically.

Contact the domestic violence hotline at 305-285-5900 to learn the detailed steps you should take to exit the vicious cycle of domestic violence.

By: Katherine Fernández Rundle, Miami-Dade County State Attorney